Who’s in charge?

Revelation 1
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I don’t want the keys.

People like to conjecture what they’d do better if they ruled the world instead of the seemingly washed-up guys sitting in the hot seat every day. We believe our degree of wisdom or view on humanity exceeds these uber-powerful folks that seem to have no idea what they’re doing.

As for me, I want none of it.

I don’t want a target on my back, a camera in my face, bills in my lap, and people yelling at me outside my window. I don’t want to be in charge. I don’t care how much money I’d make doing it.  It’d never be worth it.

Maybe you disagree.  Perhaps the office of world leader seems appealing to you. I say, go for it, but leave me out of it.

But there is one office that cannot be taken up, and it is an office that far too many strive to muscle and reason their way into, even dismissing the authority of the position altogether in order to establish themselves. It is the position of Lord of the heavens and earth.

He has the keys

I am He who lives, and was dead, and behold, I am alive forevermore. Amen. And I have the keys of Hades and of Death.

There are several Christian groups rising up that have a weird perspective on Jesus’ Lordship.  Indeed, they believe He is God, but they behave and speak as if they have jurisdiction over how He operates, even “acting” on His behalf. Many even say they’re operating with the authority of God. But who actually has the keys?

He grants permission

The disciples squabbled throughout their time with Jesus on earth — possibly more than what’s recorded — about who was the greatest. These guys were no different from ourselves, looking for a foothold to elevate themselves among their peers.  And Jesus would rebuff them for it, much to their dismay.

But in case they got any fancy ideas, in the end, Jesus gets the last word:

And Jesus came and spoke to them, saying, “All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.”

The opening of Revelation begins with the same sentiment: John has been given this vision from the start; none of this is fabricated or of His own contrivance. He doesn’t dictate God’s desires; He is a mere ambassador, a humble servant before Him.

Everyone will know it, someday

As explained earlier, some people deny Him outright.  A growing population in the U.S. believes that the Bible is hogwash, and that God is an imaginary entity or, at best, an undefinable figure that we occasionally pray to in an irreverent manner, and that humans can empirically formulate their own concept of a deity, no sweat

But this returns us to our initial argument: do you really want that kind of authority?

Behold, He is coming with clouds, and every eye will see Him, even they who pierced Him. And all the tribes of the earth will mourn because of Him. Even so, Amen.

If you believe that God is real, and that the hope of humanity rests in the truth that the Bible contends, this passage should both stir you up and provide you with hope.  The promise asserted here is that, one day, everyone will know who God is. For those who have denied Him, it will be far too late.

I’d rather take my chances with a God that has power over life and death, that both loves endlessly and judges with righteousness and truth, rather than entrust my limited, wishy-washy, impulsive and flawed self to call the shots. I’m sure you can agree: perhaps being in charge is overrated.

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